Identity Theft Attorney

What is Identity Theft?

The term “identity theft” means a fraud committed using the identifying information of another person, subject to such further definition as the Bureau may prescribe, by regulation.

How Do You Know If Your Identity Has Been Stolen?

• Have you received a debt collection letter for a debt you don’t owe?
• Have you received a letter conforming n application for credit that you did not apply for?
• Have one of your creditors reached out to notify or confirm a changed billing address when you have not?
• Have one of your creditors sent a notice that your credit limit has reduced due to your account being closed?
• Are there any accounts on your credit report that you do not recognize?
• Have there been recent inquires on your credit report that you did not authorize?
• Does your credit report include any inaccurate information including: incorrect date of birth, incorrect phone number, incorrect social security number, incorrect address, etc.?

What Are Your Rights?

• The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) states you, as a consumer, have the right to sue creditors and the credit bureaus (Equifax, TransUnion, and Experian) for monetary damages and attorney costs.
• Under the FCRA Credit Bureaus have a guideline to follow reasonable procedures to provide accuracy and fairness of credit reporting. Failure to follow these guidelines can result in a FCRA violation.

What Steps Do You Need To Take?

Step 1 – Place a fraud alert on your credit report, do this by contacting the credit reporting agencies (numbers listed below). Having a fraud alert on your account ensures that businesses must verify your identity when accounts are open and they may contact you. Fraud alert will stay on your report for ninety (90) days.

Experian (888) 397-3742
Equifax (800) 525-6285
Transunion (800) 680-7289

Step 2 – Get recent credit reports. You are allowed a free copy of your credit report if you are, or believe, to be a victim of indemnity theft.
Step 3 – File a police report. Head to your local police department and alert them you have been a victim of identity theft. Having a police report will make your case much stronger.
Step 4 – Complete an FTC Affidavit. This form needs to be filled out if you have been a victim of identity theft and sent to the Credit Reporting Agencies to dispute any accounts resulting in identify theft. You can find the form by going directly to FTC at https://www.identitytheft.gov/
Step 5 – Wait 4 days. Credit Reporting Agencies have 4 days, after receiving the FTC to correct your credit report. Failure to correct these mistakes is an FCRA violation and allows a lawsuit to be brought against the agencies, at no cost to you.

Contact Attorney Shawn Jaffer for a Free Case Evaluation at (214) 210-0730

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